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  • Cellular Electron Cryotomography: Toward Structural Biology In Situ
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Catherine M. Oikonomou, Grant J. Jensen

    Electron cryotomography (ECT) provides three-dimensional views of macromolecular complexes inside cells in a native frozen–hydrated state. Over the last two decades, ECT has revealed the ultrastructure of cells in unprecedented detail. It has also allowed us to visualize the structures of macromolecular machines in their native context inside intact cells. In many cases, such machines cannot be purified intact for in vitro study. In other cases, the function of a structure is lost outside the cell, so that the mechanism can be understood only by observation in situ. In this review, we describe the technique and its history and provide examples of its power when applied to cell biology. We also discuss the integration of ECT with other techniques, including lower-resolution fluorescence imaging and higher-resolution atomic structure determination, to cover the full scale of cellular processes.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Microbial Rhodopsins: Diversity, Mechanisms, and Optogenetic Applications
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Elena G. Govorunova, Oleg A. Sineshchekov, Hai Li, John L. Spudich

    Microbial rhodopsins are a family of photoactive retinylidene proteins widespread throughout the microbial world. They are notable for their diversity of function, using variations of a shared seven-transmembrane helix design and similar photochemical reactions to carry out distinctly different light-driven energy and sensory transduction processes. Their study has contributed to our understanding of how evolution modifies protein scaffolds to create new protein chemistry, and their use as tools to control membrane potential with light is fundamental to optogenetics for research and clinical applications. We review the currently known functions and present more in-depth assessment of three functionally and structurally distinct types discovered over the past two years: (a) anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs) from cryptophyte algae, which enable efficient optogenetic neural suppression; (b) cryptophyte cation channelrhodopsins (CCRs), structurally distinct from the green algae CCRs used extensively for neural activation and from cryptophyte ACRs; and (c) enzymerhodopsins, with light-gated guanylyl cyclase or kinase activity promising for optogenetic control of signal transduction.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Teaching Old Dyes New Tricks: Biological Probes Built from Fluoresceins and Rhodamines
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Luke D. Lavis

    Small-molecule fluorophores, such as fluorescein and rhodamine derivatives, are critical tools in modern biochemical and biological research. The field of chemical dyes is old; colored molecules were first discovered in the 1800s, and the fluorescein and rhodamine scaffolds have been known for over a century. Nevertheless, there has been a renaissance in using these dyes to create tools for biochemistry and biology. The application of modern chemistry, biochemistry, molecular genetics, and optical physics to these old structures enables and drives the development of novel, sophisticated fluorescent dyes. This critical review focuses on an important example of chemical biology—the melding of old and new chemical knowledge—leading to useful molecules for advanced biochemical and biological experiments.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Extracellular Heme Uptake and the Challenge of Bacterial Cell Membranes
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Weiliang Huang, Angela Wilks

    Iron is essential for the survival of most bacteria but presents a significant challenge given its limited bioavailability. Furthermore, the toxicity of iron combined with the need to maintain physiological iron levels within a narrow concentration range requires sophisticated systems to sense, regulate, and transport iron. Most bacteria have evolved mechanisms to chelate and transport ferric iron (Fe3+) via siderophore receptor systems, and pathogenic bacteria have further lowered this barrier by employing mechanisms to utilize the host's hemoproteins. Once internalized, heme is cleaved by both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms to release iron. Heme, itself a lipophilic and toxic molecule, presents a significant challenge for transport into the cell. As such, pathogenic bacteria have evolved sophisticated cell surface signaling and transport systems to obtain heme from the host. In this review, we summarize the structure and function of the heme-sensing and transport systems of pathogenic bacteria and the potential of these systems as antimicrobial targets.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Redox-Based Regulation of Bacterial Development and Behavior
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Abigail J. Sporer, Lisa J. Kahl, Alexa Price-Whelan, Lars E.P. Dietrich

    Severe changes in the environmental redox potential, and resulting alterations in the oxidation states of intracellular metabolites and enzymes, have historically been considered negative stressors, requiring responses that are strictly defensive. However, recent work in diverse organisms has revealed that more subtle changes in the intracellular redox state can act as signals, eliciting responses with benefits beyond defense and detoxification. Changes in redox state have been shown to influence or trigger chromosome segregation, sporulation, aerotaxis, and social behaviors, including luminescence as well as biofilm establishment and dispersal. Connections between redox state and complex behavior allow bacteria to link developmental choices with metabolic state and coordinate appropriate responses. Promising future directions for this area of study include metabolomic analysis of species- and condition-dependent changes in metabolite oxidation states and elucidation of the mechanisms whereby the redox state influences circadian regulation.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Multiple Functions and Regulation of Mammalian Peroxiredoxins
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Sue Goo Rhee, In Sup Kil

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) constitute a major family of peroxidases, with mammalian cells expressing six Prx isoforms (PrxI to PrxVI). Cells produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at various intracellular locations where it can serve as a signaling molecule. Given that Prxs are abundant and possess a structure that renders the cysteine (Cys) residue at the active site highly sensitive to oxidation by H2O2, the signaling function of this oxidant requires extensive and highly localized regulation. Recent findings on the reversible regulation of PrxI through phosphorylation at the centrosome and on the hyperoxidation of the Cys at the active site of PrxIII in mitochondria are described in this review as examples of such local regulation of H2O2 signaling. Moreover, their high affinity for and sensitivity to oxidation by H2O2 confer on Prxs the ability to serve as sensors and transducers of H2O2 signaling through transfer of their oxidation state to bound effector proteins.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Oxidative Stress
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Helmut Sies, Carsten Berndt, Dean P. Jones

    Oxidative stress is two sided: Whereas excessive oxidant challenge causes damage to biomolecules, maintenance of a physiological level of oxidant challenge, termed oxidative eustress, is essential for governing life processes through redox signaling. Recent interest has focused on the intricate ways by which redox signaling integrates these converse properties. Redox balance is maintained by prevention, interception, and repair, and concomitantly the regulatory potential of molecular thiol-driven master switches such as Nrf2/Keap1 or NF-κB/IκB is used for system-wide oxidative stress response. Nonradical species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or singlet molecular oxygen, rather than free-radical species, perform major second messenger functions. Chemokine-controlled NADPH oxidases and metabolically controlled mitochondrial sources of H2O2 as well as glutathione- and thioredoxin-related pathways, with powerful enzymatic back-up systems, are responsible for fine-tuning physiological redox signaling. This makes for a rich research field spanning from biochemistry and cell biology into nutritional sciences, environmental medicine, and molecular knowledge-based redox medicine.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Mitochondrial Machineries for Protein Import and Assembly
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Nils Wiedemann, Nikolaus Pfanner

    Mitochondria are essential organelles with numerous functions in cellular metabolism and homeostasis. Most of the >1,000 different mitochondrial proteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and are imported into mitochondria by five transport pathways. The protein import machineries of the mitochondrial membranes and aqueous compartments reveal a remarkable variability of mechanisms for protein recognition, translocation, and sorting. The protein translocases do not operate as separate entities but are connected to each other and to machineries with functions in energetics, membrane organization, and quality control. Here, we discuss the versatility and dynamic organization of the mitochondrial protein import machineries. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial protein translocation is crucial for understanding the integration of protein translocases into a large network that controls organelle biogenesis, function, and dynamics.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Endoplasmic Reticulum–Plasma Membrane Contact Sites
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Yasunori Saheki, Pietro De Camilli

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has a broad localization throughout the cell and forms direct physical contacts with all other classes of membranous organelles, including the plasma membrane (PM). A number of protein tethers that mediate these contacts have been identified, and study of these protein tethers has revealed a multiplicity of roles in cell physiology, including regulation of intracellular Ca2+ dynamics and signaling as well as control of lipid traffic and homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the cross talk between the ER and the PM mediated by direct contacts. We review factors that tether the two membranes, their properties, and their dynamics in response to the functional state of the cell. We focus in particular on the role of ER–PM contacts in nonvesicular lipid transport between the two bilayers mediated by lipid transfer proteins.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • The Evolution of Organellar Coat Complexes and Organization of the Eukaryotic Cell
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Michael P. Rout, Mark C. Field

    Eukaryotic cells possess a remarkably diverse range of organelles that provide compartmentalization for distinct cellular functions and are likely responsible for the remarkable success of these organisms. The origins and subsequent elaboration of these compartments represent a key aspect in the transition between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular forms. The protein machinery required to build, maintain, and define many membrane-bound compartments is encoded by several paralog families, including small GTPases, coiled-bundle proteins, and proteins with β-propeller and α-solenoid secondary structures. Together these proteins provide the membrane coats and control systems to structure and coordinate the endomembrane system. Mechanistically and evolutionarily, they unite not only secretory and endocytic organelles but also the flagellum and nucleus. The ancient origins for these families have been revealed by recent findings, providing new perspectives on the deep evolutionary processes and relationships that underlie eukaryotic cell structure.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • How α-Helical Motifs Form Functionally Diverse Lipid-Binding Compartments
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Lucy Malinina, Dinshaw J. Patel, Rhoderick E. Brown

    Lipids are produced site-specifically in cells and then distributed nonrandomly among membranes via vesicular and nonvesicular trafficking mechanisms. The latter involves soluble amphitropic proteins extracting specific lipids from source membranes to function as molecular solubilizers that envelope their insoluble cargo before transporting it to destination sites. Lipid-binding and lipid transfer structural motifs range from multi-β-strand barrels, to β-sheet cups and baskets covered by α-helical lids, to multi-α-helical bundles and layers. Here, we focus on how α-helical proteins use amphipathic helical layering and bundling to form modular lipid-binding compartments and discuss the functional consequences. Preformed compartments generally rely on intramolecular disulfide bridging to maintain conformation (e.g., albumins, nonspecific lipid transfer proteins, saposins, nematode polyprotein allergens/antigens). Insights into nonpreformed hydrophobic compartments that expand and adapt to accommodate a lipid occupant are few and provided mostly by the three-layer, α-helical ligand-binding domain of nuclear receptors. The simple but elegant and nearly ubiquitous two-layer, α-helical glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP)-fold now further advances understanding.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Molecular Characteristics and Biological Functions of Surface-Active and Surfactant Proteins
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Margaret Sunde, Chi L.L. Pham, Ann H. Kwan

    Many critical biological processes take place at hydrophobic:hydrophilic interfaces, and a wide range of organisms produce surface-active proteins and peptides that reduce surface and interfacial tension and mediate growth and development at these boundaries. Microorganisms produce both small lipid–associated peptides and amphipathic proteins that allow growth across water:air boundaries, attachment to surfaces, predation, and improved bioavailability of hydrophobic substrates. Higher-order organisms produce surface-active proteins with a wide variety of functions, including the provision of protective foam environments for vulnerable reproductive stages, evaporative cooling, and gas exchange across airway membranes. In general, the biological functions supported by these diverse polypeptides require them to have an amphipathic nature, and this is achieved by a diverse range of molecular structures, with some proteins undergoing significant conformational change or intermolecular association to generate the structures that are surface active.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • A Bright Future for Antibiotics?
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Donna Matzov, Anat Bashan, Ada Yonath

    Multidrug resistance is a global threat as the clinically available potent antibiotic drugs are becoming exceedingly scarce. For example, increasing drug resistance among gram-positive bacteria is responsible for approximately one-third of nosocomial infections. As ribosomes are a major target for these drugs, they may serve as suitable objects for novel development of next-generation antibiotics. Three-dimensional structures of ribosomal particles from Staphylococcus aureus obtained by X-ray crystallography have shed light on fine details of drug binding sites and have revealed unique structural motifs specific for this pathogenic strain, which may be used for the design of novel degradable pathogen-specific, and hence, environmentally friendly drugs.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Cyclic GMP–AMP as an Endogenous Second Messenger in Innate Immune Signaling by Cytosolic DNA
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Kazuki Kato, Hiroki Omura, Ryuichiro Ishitani, Osamu Nureki

    The innate immune system functions as the first line of defense against invading bacteria and viruses. In this context, the cGAS/STING [cyclic guanosine monophosphate (GMP)–adenosine monophosphate (AMP) synthase/STING] signaling axis perceives the nonself DNA associated with bacterial and viral infections, as well as the leakage of self DNA by cellular dysfunction and stresses, to elicit the host's immune responses. In this pathway, the noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide 2′,3′-cyclic GMP–AMP (2′,3′-cGAMP) functions as a second messenger for signal transduction: 2′,3′-cGAMP is produced by the enzyme cGAS upon its recognition of double-stranded DNA, and then the 2′,3′-cGAMP is recognized by the receptor STING to induce the phosphorylation of downstream factors, including TBK1 (TANK binding kinase 1) and IRF3 (interferon regulatory factor 3). Numerous crystal structures of the components of this cGAS/STING signaling axis have been reported and these clarify the structural basis for their signal transduction mechanisms. In this review, we summarize recent progress made in the structural dissection of this signaling pathway and indicate possible directions of forthcoming research.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Engineering and In Vivo Applications of Riboswitches
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Zachary F. Hallberg, Yichi Su, Rebekah Z. Kitto, Ming C. Hammond

    Riboswitches are common gene regulatory units mostly found in bacteria that are capable of altering gene expression in response to a small molecule. These structured RNA elements consist of two modular subunits: an aptamer domain that binds with high specificity and affinity to a target ligand and an expression platform that transduces ligand binding to a gene expression output. Significant progress has been made in engineering novel aptamer domains for new small molecule inducers of gene expression. Modified expression platforms have also been optimized to function when fused with both natural and synthetic aptamer domains. As this field expands, the use of these privileged scaffolds has permitted the development of tools such as RNA-based fluorescent biosensors. In this review, we summarize the methods that have been developed to engineer new riboswitches and highlight applications of natural and synthetic riboswitches in enzyme and strain engineering, in controlling gene expression and cellular physiology, and in real-time imaging of cellular metabolites and signals.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • A New Facet of Vitamin B12: Gene Regulation by Cobalamin-Based Photoreceptors
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    S. Padmanabhan, Marco Jost, Catherine L. Drennan, Montserrat Elías-Arnanz

    Living organisms sense and respond to light, a crucial environmental factor, using photoreceptors, which rely on bound chromophores such as retinal, flavins, or linear tetrapyrroles for light sensing. The discovery of photoreceptors that sense light using 5′-deoxyadenosylcobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 that is best known as an enzyme cofactor, has expanded the number of known photoreceptor families and unveiled a new biological role of this vitamin. The prototype of these B12-dependent photoreceptors, the transcriptional repressor CarH, is widespread in bacteria and mediates light-dependent gene regulation in a photoprotective cellular response. CarH activity as a transcription factor relies on the modulation of its oligomeric state by 5′-deoxyadenosylcobalamin and light. This review surveys current knowledge about these B12-dependent photoreceptors, their distribution and mode of action, and the structural and photochemical basis of how they orchestrate signal transduction and control gene expression.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Site-Specific Self-Catalyzed DNA Depurination: A Biological Mechanism That Leads to Mutations and Creates Sequence Diversity
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Jacques R. Fresco, Olga Amosova

    Self-catalyzed DNA depurination is a sequence-specific physiological mechanism mediated by spontaneous extrusion of a stem-loop catalytic intermediate. Hydrolysis of the 5′G residue of the 5′GA/TGG loop and of the first 5′A residue of the 5′GAGA loop, together with particular first stem base pairs, specifies their hydrolysis without involving protein, cofactor, or cation. As such, this mechanism is the only known DNA catalytic activity exploited by nature. The consensus sequences for self-depurination of such G- and A-loop residues occur in all genomes examined across the phyla, averaging one site every 2,000–4,000 base pairs. Because apurinic sites are subject to error-prone repair, leading to substitution and short frameshift mutations, they are both a source of genome damage and a means for creating sequence diversity. Their marked overrepresentation in genomes, and largely unchanging density from the lowest to the highest organisms, indicate their selection over the course of evolution. The mutagenicity at such sites in many human genes is associated with loss of function of key proteins responsible for diverse diseases.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Telomerase Mechanism of Telomere Synthesis
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    R. Alex Wu, Heather E. Upton, Jacob M. Vogan, Kathleen Collins

    Telomerase is the essential reverse transcriptase required for linear chromosome maintenance in most eukaryotes. Telomerase supplements the tandem array of simple-sequence repeats at chromosome ends to compensate for the DNA erosion inherent in genome replication. The template for telomerase reverse transcriptase is within the RNA subunit of the ribonucleoprotein complex, which in cells contains additional telomerase holoenzyme proteins that assemble the active ribonucleoprotein and promote its function at telomeres. Telomerase is distinct among polymerases in its reiterative reuse of an internal template. The template is precisely defined, processively copied, and regenerated by release of single-stranded product DNA. New specificities of nucleic acid handling that underlie the catalytic cycle of repeat synthesis derive from both active site specialization and new motif elaborations in protein and RNA subunits. Studies of telomerase provide unique insights into cellular requirements for genome stability, tissue renewal, and tumorigenesis as well as new perspectives on dynamic ribonucleoprotein machines.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Peter M.J. Burgers, Thomas A. Kunkel

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Electric Fields and Enzyme Catalysis
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Stephen D. Fried, Steven G. Boxer

    What happens inside an enzyme's active site to allow slow and difficult chemical reactions to occur so rapidly? This question has occupied biochemists’ attention for a long time. Computer models of increasing sophistication have predicted an important role for electrostatic interactions in enzymatic reactions, yet this hypothesis has proved vexingly difficult to test experimentally. Recent experiments utilizing the vibrational Stark effect make it possible to measure the electric field a substrate molecule experiences when bound inside its enzyme's active site. These experiments have provided compelling evidence supporting a major electrostatic contribution to enzymatic catalysis. Here, we review these results and develop a simple model for electrostatic catalysis that enables us to incorporate disparate concepts introduced by many investigators to describe how enzymes work into a more unified framework stressing the importance of electric fields at the active site.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Biochemistry of Catabolic Reductive Dehalogenation
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Maeva Fincker, Alfred M. Spormann

    A wide range of phylogenetically diverse microorganisms couple the reductive dehalogenation of organohalides to energy conservation. Key enzymes of such anaerobic catabolic pathways are corrinoid and Fe–S cluster–containing, membrane-associated reductive dehalogenases. These enzymes catalyze the reductive elimination of a halide and constitute the terminal reductases of a short electron transfer chain. Enzymatic and physiological studies revealed the existence of quinone-dependent and quinone-independent reductive dehalogenases that are distinguishable at the amino acid sequence level, implying different modes of energy conservation in the respective microorganisms. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about catabolic reductive dehalogenases and the electron transfer chain they are part of. We review reaction mechanisms and the role of the corrinoid and Fe–S cluster cofactors and discuss physiological implications.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Conceptual and Experimental Tools to Understand Spatial Effects and Transport Phenomena in Nonlinear Biochemical Networks Illustrated with Patchy Switching
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Rebecca R. Pompano, Andrew H. Chiang, Christian J. Kastrup, Rustem F. Ismagilov

    Many biochemical systems are spatially heterogeneous and exhibit nonlinear behaviors, such as state switching in response to small changes in the local concentration of diffusible molecules. Systems as varied as blood clotting, intracellular calcium signaling, and tissue inflammation are all heavily influenced by the balance of rates of reaction and mass transport phenomena including flow and diffusion. Transport of signaling molecules is also affected by geometry and chemoselective confinement via matrix binding. In this review, we use a phenomenon referred to as patchy switching to illustrate the interplay of nonlinearities, transport phenomena, and spatial effects. Patchy switching describes a change in the state of a network when the local concentration of a diffusible molecule surpasses a critical threshold. Using patchy switching as an example, we describe conceptual tools from nonlinear dynamics and chemical engineering that make testable predictions and provide a unifying description of the myriad possible experimental observations. We describe experimental microfluidic and biochemical tools emerging to test conceptual predictions by controlling transport phenomena and spatial distribution of diffusible signals, and we highlight the unmet need for in vivo tools.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Mutation and (R)-2-Hydroxyglutarate: From Basic Discovery to Therapeutics Development
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Lenny Dang, Shin-San Michael Su

    The identification of heterozygous mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in subsets of cancers, including secondary glioblastoma, acute myeloid leukemia, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, and chondrosarcomas, led to intense discovery efforts to delineate the mutations’ involvement in carcinogenesis and to develop therapeutics, which we review here. The three IDH isoforms (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate–dependent IDH1 and IDH2, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide–dependent IDH3) contribute to regulating the circuitry of central metabolism. Several biochemical and genetic observations led to the discovery of the neomorphic production of the oncometabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) by mutant IDH1 and IDH2 (mIDH). Heterozygous mutation of IDH1/2 and accumulation of 2-HG cause profound metabolic and epigenetic dysregulation, including inhibition of normal cellular differentiation, leading to disease. Crystallographic structural studies during the development of compounds targeting mIDH demonstrated common allosteric inhibition by distinct chemotypes. Ongoing clinical trials in patients with mIDH advanced hematologic malignancies have demonstrated compelling clinical proof-of-concept, validating the biology and drug discovery approach.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Metabolite Measurement: Pitfalls to Avoid and Practices to Follow
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Wenyun Lu, Xiaoyang Su, Matthias S. Klein, Ian A. Lewis, Oliver Fiehn, Joshua D. Rabinowitz

    Metabolites are the small biological molecules involved in energy conversion and biosynthesis. Studying metabolism is inherently challenging due to metabolites’ reactivity, structural diversity, and broad concentration range. Herein, we review the common pitfalls encountered in metabolomics and provide concrete guidelines for obtaining accurate metabolite measurements, focusing on water-soluble primary metabolites. We show how seemingly straightforward sample preparation methods can introduce systematic errors (e.g., owing to interconversion among metabolites) and how proper selection of quenching solvent (e.g., acidic acetonitrile:methanol:water) can mitigate such problems. We discuss the specific strengths, pitfalls, and best practices for each common analytical platform: liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and enzyme assays. Together this information provides a pragmatic knowledge base for carrying out biologically informative metabolite measurements.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Systems Biology of Metabolism
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Jens Nielsen

    Metabolism is highly complex and involves thousands of different connected reactions; it is therefore necessary to use mathematical models for holistic studies. The use of mathematical models in biology is referred to as systems biology. In this review, the principles of systems biology are described, and two different types of mathematical models used for studying metabolism are discussed: kinetic models and genome-scale metabolic models. The use of different omics technologies, including transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and fluxomics, for studying metabolism is presented. Finally, the application of systems biology for analyzing global regulatory structures, engineering the metabolism of cell factories, and analyzing human diseases is discussed.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Mechanisms of Autophagy Initiation
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    James H. Hurley, Lindsey N. Young

    Autophagy is the process of cellular self-eating by a double-membrane organelle, the autophagosome. A range of signaling processes converge on two protein complexes to initiate autophagy: the ULK1 (unc51-like autophagy activating kinase 1) protein kinase complex and the PI3KC3–C1 (class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase complex I) lipid kinase complex. Some 90% of the mass of these large protein complexes consists of noncatalytic domains and subunits, and the ULK1 complex has essential noncatalytic activities. Structural studies of these complexes have shed increasing light on the regulation of their catalytic and noncatalytic activities in autophagy initiation. The autophagosome is thought to nucleate from vesicles containing the integral membrane protein Atg9 (autophagy-related 9), COPII (coat protein complex II) vesicles, and possibly other sources. In the wake of reconstitution and super-resolution imaging studies, we are beginning to understand how the ULK1 and PI3KC3–C1 complexes might coordinate the nucleation and fusion of Atg9 and COPII vesicles at the start of autophagosome biogenesis.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Proteasomal and Autophagic Degradation Systems
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Ivan Dikic

    Autophagy and the ubiquitin–proteasome system are the two major quality control pathways responsible for cellular homeostasis. As such, they provide protection against age-associated changes and a plethora of human diseases. Ubiquitination is utilized as a degradation signal by both systems, albeit in different ways, to mark cargoes for proteasomal and lysosomal degradation. Both systems intersect and communicate at multiple points to coordinate their actions in proteostasis and organelle homeostasis. This review summarizes molecular details of how proteasome and autophagy pathways are functionally interconnected in cells and indicates common principles and nodes of communication that can be therapeutically exploited.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Mechanisms of Deubiquitinase Specificity and Regulation
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Tycho E.T. Mevissen, David Komander

    Protein ubiquitination is one of the most powerful posttranslational modifications of proteins, as it regulates a plethora of cellular processes in distinct manners. Simple monoubiquitination events coexist with more complex forms of polyubiquitination, the latter featuring many different chain architectures. Ubiquitin can be subjected to further posttranslational modifications (e.g., phosphorylation and acetylation) and can also be part of mixed polymers with ubiquitin-like modifiers such as SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) or NEDD8 (neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 8). Together, cellular ubiquitination events form a sophisticated and versatile ubiquitin code. Deubiquitinases (DUBs) reverse ubiquitin signals with equally high sophistication. In this review, we conceptualize the many layers of specificity that DUBs encompass to control the ubiquitin code and discuss examples in which DUB specificity has been understood at the molecular level. We further discuss the many mechanisms of DUB regulation with a focus on those that modulate catalytic activity. Our review provides a framework to tackle lingering questions in DUB biology.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Ubiquitin Ligases: Structure, Function, and Regulation
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Ning Zheng, Nitzan Shabek

    Ubiquitin E3 ligases control every aspect of eukaryotic biology by promoting protein ubiquitination and degradation. At the end of a three-enzyme cascade, ubiquitin ligases mediate the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to specific substrate proteins. Early investigations of E3s of the RING (really interesting new gene) and HECT (homologous to the E6AP carboxyl terminus) types shed light on their enzymatic activities, general architectures, and substrate degron-binding modes. Recent studies have provided deeper mechanistic insights into their catalysis, activation, and regulation. In this review, we summarize the current progress in structure–function studies of ubiquitin ligases as well as exciting new discoveries of novel classes of E3s and diverse substrate recognition mechanisms. Our increased understanding of ubiquitin ligase function and regulation has provided the rationale for developing E3-targeting therapeutics for the treatment of human diseases.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • The Ubiquitin System, Autophagy, and Regulated Protein Degradation
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Alexander Varshavsky

    This brief disquisition about the early history of studies on regulated protein degradation introduces several detailed reviews about the ubiquitin system and autophagy.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Mechanisms and Functions of Spatial Protein Quality Control
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Emily Mitchell Sontag, Rahul S. Samant, Judith Frydman

    A healthy proteome is essential for cell survival. Protein misfolding is linked to a rapidly expanding list of human diseases, ranging from neurodegenerative diseases to aging and cancer. Many of these diseases are characterized by the accumulation of misfolded proteins in intra- and extracellular inclusions, such as amyloid plaques. The clear link between protein misfolding and disease highlights the need to better understand the elaborate machinery that manages proteome homeostasis, or proteostasis, in the cell. Proteostasis depends on a network of molecular chaperones and clearance pathways involved in the recognition, refolding, and/or clearance of aberrant proteins. Recent studies reveal that an integral part of the cellular management of misfolded proteins is their spatial sequestration into several defined compartments. Here, we review the properties, function, and formation of these compartments. Spatial sequestration plays a central role in protein quality control and cellular fitness and represents a critical link to the pathogenesis of protein aggregation-linked diseases.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Structural Studies of Amyloid Proteins at the Molecular Level
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    David S. Eisenberg, Michael R. Sawaya

    Dozens of proteins are known to convert to the aggregated amyloid state. These include fibrils associated with systemic and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, functional amyloid fibrils in microorganisms and animals, and many denatured proteins. Amyloid fibrils can be much more stable than other protein assemblies. In contrast to globular proteins, a single protein sequence can aggregate into several distinctly different amyloid structures, termed polymorphs, and a given polymorph can reproduce itself by seeding. Amyloid polymorphs may be the molecular basis of prion strains. Whereas the Protein Data Bank contains some 100,000 globular protein and 3,000 membrane protein structures, only a few dozen amyloid protein structures have been determined, and most of these are short segments of full amyloid-forming proteins. Regardless, these amyloid structures illuminate the architecture of the amyloid state, including its stability and its capacity for formation of polymorphs.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Protein Misfolding, Amyloid Formation, and Human Disease: A Summary of Progress Over the Last Decade
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Fabrizio Chiti, Christopher M. Dobson

    Peptides and proteins have been found to possess an inherent tendency to convert from their native functional states into intractable amyloid aggregates. This phenomenon is associated with a range of increasingly common human disorders, including Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, type II diabetes, and a number of systemic amyloidoses. In this review, we describe this field of science with particular reference to the advances that have been made over the last decade in our understanding of its fundamental nature and consequences. We list the proteins that are known to be deposited as amyloid or other types of aggregates in human tissues and the disorders with which they are associated, as well as the proteins that exploit the amyloid motif to play specific functional roles in humans. In addition, we summarize the genetic factors that have provided insight into the mechanisms of disease onset. We describe recent advances in our knowledge of the structures of amyloid fibrils and their oligomeric precursors and of the mechanisms by which they are formed and proliferate to generate cellular dysfunction. We show evidence that a complex proteostasis network actively combats protein aggregation and that such an efficient system can fail in some circumstances and give rise to disease. Finally, we anticipate the development of novel therapeutic strategies with which to prevent or treat these highly debilitating and currently incurable conditions.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Protein Misfolding Diseases
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    F. Ulrich Hartl

    The majority of protein molecules must fold into defined three-dimensional structures to acquire functional activity. However, protein chains can adopt a multitude of conformational states, and their biologically active conformation is often only marginally stable. Metastable proteins tend to populate misfolded species that are prone to forming toxic aggregates, including soluble oligomers and fibrillar amyloid deposits, which are linked with neurodegeneration in Alzheimer and Parkinson disease, and many other pathologies. To prevent or regulate protein aggregation, all cells contain an extensive protein homeostasis (or proteostasis) network comprising molecular chaperones and other factors. These defense systems tend to decline during aging, facilitating the manifestation of aggregate deposition diseases. This volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry contains a set of three articles addressing our current understanding of the structures of pathological protein aggregates and their associated disease mechanisms. These articles also discuss recent insights into the strategies cells have evolved to neutralize toxic aggregates by sequestering them in specific cellular locations.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • At the Intersection of Chemistry, Biology, and Medicine
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2017-06-27
    Christopher T. Walsh

    After an undergraduate degree in biology at Harvard, I started graduate school at The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research in New York City in July 1965. I was attracted to the chemical side of biochemistry and joined Fritz Lipmann's large, hierarchical laboratory to study enzyme mechanisms. That work led to postdoctoral research with Robert Abeles at Brandeis, then a center of what, 30 years later, would be called chemical biology. I spent 15 years on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology faculty, in both the Chemistry and Biology Departments, and then 26 years on the Harvard Medical School Faculty. My research interests have been at the intersection of chemistry, biology, and medicine. One unanticipated major focus has been investigating the chemical logic and enzymatic machinery of natural product biosynthesis, including antibiotics and antitumor agents. In this postgenomic era it is now recognized that there may be from 105 to 106 biosynthetic gene clusters as yet uncharacterized for potential new therapeutic agents.

    更新日期:2017-10-10
  • Cellular Homeostasis and Aging
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    F. Ulrich Hartl

    Aging and longevity are controlled by a multiplicity of molecular and cellular signaling events that interface with environmental factors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Modulation of these pathways to extend life span, including insulin-like signaling and the response to dietary restriction, identified the cellular machineries and networks of protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and stress resistance pathways as critical players in the aging process. A decline of proteostasis capacity during aging leads to dysfunction of specific cell types and tissues, rendering the organism susceptible to a range of chronic diseases. This volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry contains a set of two reviews addressing our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying aging in model organisms and humans.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Dietary Protein, Metabolism, and Aging
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    George A. Soultoukis, Linda Partridge

    Dietary restriction (DR), a moderate reduction in food intake, improves health during aging and extends life span across multiple species. Specific nutrients, rather than overall calories, mediate the effects of DR, with protein and specific amino acids (AAs) playing a key role. Modulations of single dietary AAs affect traits including growth, reproduction, physiology, health, and longevity in animals. Epidemiological data in humans also link the quality and quantity of dietary proteins to long-term health. Intricate nutrient-sensing pathways fine tune the metabolic responses to dietary AAs in a highly conserved manner. In turn, these metabolic responses can affect the onset of insulin resistance, obesity, neurodegenerative disease, and other age-related diseases. In this review we discuss how AA requirements are shaped and how ingested AAs regulate a spectrum of homeostatic processes. Finally, we highlight the resulting opportunity to develop nutritional strategies to improve human health during aging.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Signaling Networks Determining Life Span
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Celine E. Riera, Carsten Merkwirth, C. Daniel De Magalhaes Filho, Andrew Dillin

    The health of an organism is orchestrated by a multitude of molecular and biochemical networks responsible for ensuring homeostasis within cells and tissues. However, upon aging, a progressive failure in the maintenance of this homeostatic balance occurs in response to a variety of endogenous and environmental stresses, allowing the accumulation of damage, the physiological decline of individual tissues, and susceptibility to diseases. What are the molecular and cellular signaling events that control the aging process and how can this knowledge help design therapeutic strategies to combat age-associated diseases? Here we provide a comprehensive overview of the evolutionarily conserved biological processes that alter the rate of aging and discuss their link to disease prevention and the extension of healthy life span.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Mitochondrial Gene Expression: A Playground of Evolutionary Tinkering
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Walter Neupert

    This article introduces the Mitochondria theme of the Annual Review of Biochemistry, Volume 85.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Organization and Regulation of Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis*
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Martin Ott, Alexey Amunts, Alan Brown

    Mitochondria are essential organelles of endosymbiotic origin that are responsible for oxidative phosphorylation within eukaryotic cells. Independent evolution between species has generated mitochondrial genomes that are extremely diverse, with the composition of the vestigial genome determining their translational requirements. Typically, translation within mitochondria is restricted to a few key subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes that are synthesized by dedicated ribosomes (mitoribosomes). The dramatically rearranged mitochondrial genomes, the limited set of transcripts, and the need for the synthesized proteins to coassemble with nuclear-encoded subunits have had substantial consequences for the translation machinery. Recent high-resolution cryo–electron microscopy has revealed the effect of coevolution on the mitoribosome with the mitochondrial genome. In this review, we place the new structural information in the context of the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial translation and focus on the novel ways protein synthesis is organized and regulated in mitochondria.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Structure and Function of the Mitochondrial Ribosome
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Basil J. Greber, Nenad Ban

    Mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) perform protein synthesis inside mitochondria, the organelles responsible for energy conversion and adenosine triphosphate production in eukaryotic cells. Throughout evolution, mitoribosomes have become functionally specialized for synthesizing mitochondrial membrane proteins, and this has been accompanied by large changes to their structure and composition. We review recent high-resolution structural data that have provided unprecedented insight into the structure and function of mitoribosomes in mammals and fungi.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Maintenance and Expression of Mammalian Mitochondrial DNA
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Claes M. Gustafsson, Maria Falkenberg, Nils-Göran Larsson

    Mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes 13 proteins that are essential for the function of the oxidative phosphorylation system, which is composed of four respiratory-chain complexes and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase. Remarkably, the maintenance and expression of mtDNA depend on the mitochondrial import of hundreds of nuclear-encoded proteins that control genome maintenance, replication, transcription, RNA maturation, and mitochondrial translation. The importance of this complex regulatory system is underscored by the identification of numerous mutations of nuclear genes that impair mtDNA maintenance and expression at different levels, causing human mitochondrial diseases with pleiotropic clinical manifestations. The basic scientific understanding of the mechanisms controlling mtDNA function has progressed considerably during the past few years, thanks to advances in biochemistry, genetics, and structural biology. The challenges for the future will be to understand how mtDNA maintenance and expression are regulated and to what extent direct intramitochondrial cross talk between different processes, such as transcription and translation, is important.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Enjoy the Trip: Calcium in Mitochondria Back and Forth
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Diego De Stefani, Rosario Rizzuto, Tullio Pozzan

    In the last 5 years, most of the molecules that control mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis have been finally identified. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is mediated by the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU) complex, a macromolecular structure that guarantees Ca2+ accumulation inside mitochondrial matrix upon increases in cytosolic Ca2+. Conversely, Ca2+ release is under the control of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, encoded by the NCLX gene, and of a H+/Ca2+ antiporter, whose identity is still debated. The low affinity of the MCU complex, coupled to the activity of the efflux systems, protects cells from continuous futile cycles of Ca2+ across the inner mitochondrial membrane and consequent massive energy dissipation. In this review, we discuss the basic principles that govern mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis and the methods used to investigate the dynamics of Ca2+ concentration within the organelles. We discuss the functional and structural role of the different molecules involved in mitochondrial Ca2+ handling and their pathophysiological role.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Mechanics and Single-Molecule Interrogation of DNA Recombination
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Jason C. Bell, Stephen C. Kowalczykowski

    The repair of DNA by homologous recombination is an essential, efficient, and high-fidelity process that mends DNA lesions formed during cellular metabolism; these lesions include double-stranded DNA breaks, daughter-strand gaps, and DNA cross-links. Genetic defects in the homologous recombination pathway undermine genomic integrity and cause the accumulation of gross chromosomal abnormalities—including rearrangements, deletions, and aneuploidy—that contribute to cancer formation. Recombination proceeds through the formation of joint DNA molecules—homologously paired but metastable DNA intermediates that are processed by several alternative subpathways—making recombination a versatile and robust mechanism to repair damaged chromosomes. Modern biophysical methods make it possible to visualize, probe, and manipulate the individual molecules participating in the intermediate steps of recombination, revealing new details about the mechanics of genetic recombination. We review and discuss the individual stages of homologous recombination, focusing on common pathways in bacteria, yeast, and humans, and place particular emphasis on the molecular mechanisms illuminated by single-molecule methods.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • CRISPR/Cas9 in Genome Editing and Beyond
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Haifeng Wang, Marie La Russa, Lei S. Qi

    The Cas9 protein (CRISPR-associated protein 9), derived from type II CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) bacterial immune systems, is emerging as a powerful tool for engineering the genome in diverse organisms. As an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease, Cas9 can be easily programmed to target new sites by altering its guide RNA sequence, and its development as a tool has made sequence-specific gene editing several magnitudes easier. The nuclease-deactivated form of Cas9 further provides a versatile RNA-guided DNA-targeting platform for regulating and imaging the genome, as well as for rewriting the epigenetic status, all in a sequence-specific manner. With all of these advances, we have just begun to explore the possible applications of Cas9 in biomedical research and therapeutics. In this review, we describe the current models of Cas9 function and the structural and biochemical studies that support it. We focus on the applications of Cas9 for genome editing, regulation, and imaging, discuss other possible applications and some technical considerations, and highlight the many advantages that CRISPR/Cas9 technology offers.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcriptional Regulation: TFIIH and Beyond
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Emmanuel Compe, Jean-Marc Egly

    Transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) is a multiprotein complex involved in both transcription and DNA repair, revealing a striking functional link between these two processes. Some of its subunits also belong to complexes involved in other cellular processes, such as chromosome segregation and cell cycle regulation, emphasizing the multitasking capabilities of this factor. This review aims to depict the structure of TFIIH and to dissect the roles of its subunits in different cellular mechanisms. Our understanding of the biochemistry of TFIIH has greatly benefited from studies focused on diseases related to TFIIH mutations. We address the etiology of these disorders and underline the fact that TFIIH can be considered a promising target for therapeutic strategies.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Transcription as a Threat to Genome Integrity
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Hélène Gaillard, Andrés Aguilera

    Genomes undergo different types of sporadic alterations, including DNA damage, point mutations, and genome rearrangements, that constitute the basis for evolution. However, these changes may occur at high levels as a result of cell pathology and trigger genome instability, a hallmark of cancer and a number of genetic diseases. In the last two decades, evidence has accumulated that transcription constitutes an important natural source of DNA metabolic errors that can compromise the integrity of the genome. Transcription can create the conditions for high levels of mutations and recombination by its ability to open the DNA structure and remodel chromatin, making it more accessible to DNA insulting agents, and by its ability to become a barrier to DNA replication. Here we review the molecular basis of such events from a mechanistic perspective with particular emphasis on the role of transcription as a genome instability determinant.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Mechanisms of Bacterial Transcription Termination: All Good Things Must End
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Ananya Ray-Soni, Michael J. Bellecourt, Robert Landick

    Transcript termination is essential for accurate gene expression and the removal of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at the ends of transcription units. In bacteria, two mechanisms are responsible for proper transcript termination: intrinsic termination and Rho-dependent termination. Intrinsic termination is mediated by signals directly encoded within the DNA template and nascent RNA, whereas Rho-dependent termination relies upon the adenosine triphosphate-dependent RNA translocase Rho, which binds nascent RNA and dissociates the elongation complex. Although significant progress has been made in understanding these pathways, fundamental details remain undetermined. Among those that remain unresolved are the existence of an inactivated intermediate in the intrinsic termination pathway, the role of Rho–RNAP interactions in Rho-dependent termination, and the mechanisms by which accessory factors and nucleoid-associated proteins affect termination. We describe current knowledge, discuss key outstanding questions, and highlight the importance of defining the structural rearrangements of RNAP that are involved in the two mechanisms of transcript termination.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Nucleic Acid–Based Nanodevices in Biological Imaging
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Kasturi Chakraborty, Aneesh T. Veetil, Samie R. Jaffrey, Yamuna Krishnan

    The nanoscale engineering of nucleic acids has led to exciting molecular technologies for high-end biological imaging. The predictable base pairing, high programmability, and superior new chemical and biological methods used to access nucleic acids with diverse lengths and in high purity, coupled with computational tools for their design, have allowed the creation of a stunning diversity of nucleic acid–based nanodevices. Given their biological origin, such synthetic devices have a tremendous capacity to interface with the biological world, and this capacity lies at the heart of several nucleic acid–based technologies that are finding applications in biological systems. We discuss these diverse applications and emphasize the advantage, in terms of physicochemical properties, that the nucleic acid scaffold brings to these contexts. As our ability to engineer this versatile scaffold increases, its applications in structural, cellular, and organismal biology are clearly poised to massively expand.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • The p53 Pathway: Origins, Inactivation in Cancer, and Emerging Therapeutic Approaches
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Andreas C. Joerger, Alan R. Fersht

    Inactivation of the transcription factor p53, through either direct mutation or aberrations in one of its many regulatory pathways, is a hallmark of virtually every tumor. In recent years, screening for p53 activators and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of oncogenic perturbations of p53 function have opened up a host of novel avenues for therapeutic intervention in cancer: from the structure-guided design of chemical chaperones to restore the function of conformationally unstable p53 cancer mutants, to the development of potent antagonists of the negative regulators MDM2 and MDMX and other modulators of the p53 pathway for the treatment of cancers with wild-type p53. Some of these compounds have now moved from proof-of-concept studies into clinical trials, with prospects for further, personalized anticancer medicines. We trace the structural evolution of the p53 pathway, from germ-line surveillance in simple multicellular organisms to its pluripotential role in humans.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • The Substrate Specificity of Sirtuins
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Poonam Bheda, Hui Jing, Cynthia Wolberger, Hening Lin

    Sirtuins are NAD+-dependent enzymes universally present in all organisms, where they play central roles in regulating numerous biological processes. Although early studies showed that sirtuins deacetylated lysines in a reaction that consumes NAD+, more recent studies have revealed that these enzymes can remove a variety of acyl-lysine modifications. The specificities for varied acyl modifications may thus underlie the distinct roles of the different sirtuins within a given organism. This review summarizes the structure, chemistry, and substrate specificity of sirtuins with a focus on how different sirtuins recognize distinct substrates and thus carry out specific functions.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Macrodomains: Structure, Function, Evolution, and Catalytic Activities
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Johannes Gregor Matthias Rack, Dragutin Perina, Ivan Ahel

    Recent developments indicate that macrodomains, an ancient and diverse protein domain family, are key players in the recognition, interpretation, and turnover of ADP-ribose (ADPr) signaling. Crucial to this is the ability of macrodomains to recognize ADPr either directly, in the form of a metabolic derivative, or as a modification covalently bound to proteins. Thus, macrodomains regulate a wide variety of cellular and organismal processes, including DNA damage repair, signal transduction, and immune response. Their importance is further indicated by the fact that dysregulation or mutation of a macrodomain is associated with several diseases, including cancer, developmental defects, and neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the current insights into macrodomain evolution and how this evolution influenced their structural and functional diversification. We highlight some aspects of macrodomain roles in pathobiology as well as their emerging potential as therapeutic targets.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Biosynthesis of the Metalloclusters of Nitrogenases
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Yilin Hu, Markus W. Ribbe

    Nitrogenase is a versatile metalloenzyme that is capable of catalyzing two important reactions under ambient conditions: the reduction of nitrogen (N2) to ammonia (NH3), a key step in the global nitrogen cycle; and the reduction of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) to hydrocarbons, two reactions useful for recycling carbon waste into carbon fuel. The molybdenum (Mo)- and vanadium (V)-nitrogenases are two homologous members of this enzyme family. Each of them contains a P-cluster and a cofactor, two high-nuclearity metalloclusters that have crucial roles in catalysis. This review summarizes the progress that has been made in elucidating the biosynthetic mechanisms of the P-cluster and cofactor species of nitrogenase, focusing on what is known about the assembly mechanisms of the two metalloclusters in Mo-nitrogenase and giving a brief account of the possible assembly schemes of their counterparts in V-nitrogenase, which are derived from the homology between the two nitrogenases.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Radical S-Adenosylmethionine Enzymes in Human Health and Disease
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Bradley J. Landgraf, Erin L. McCarthy, Squire J. Booker

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes catalyze an astonishing array of complex and chemically challenging reactions across all domains of life. Of approximately 114,000 of these enzymes, 8 are known to be present in humans: MOCS1, molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis; LIAS, lipoic acid biosynthesis; CDK5RAP1, 2-methylthio-N6-isopentenyladenosine biosynthesis; CDKAL1, methylthio-N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine biosynthesis; TYW1, wybutosine biosynthesis; ELP3, 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl uridine; and RSAD1 and viperin, both of unknown function. Aberrations in the genes encoding these proteins result in a variety of diseases. In this review, we summarize the biochemical characterization of these 8 radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes and, in the context of human health, describe the deleterious effects that result from such genetic mutations.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Ice-Binding Proteins and Their Function
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Maya Bar Dolev, Ido Braslavsky, Peter L. Davies

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) are a diverse class of proteins that assist organism survival in the presence of ice in cold climates. They have different origins in many organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, diatoms, plants, insects, and fish. This review covers the gamut of IBP structures and functions and the common features they use to bind ice. We discuss mechanisms by which IBPs adsorb to ice and interfere with its growth, evidence for their irreversible association with ice, and methods for enhancing the activity of IBPs. The applications of IBPs in the food industry, in cryopreservation, and in other technologies are vast, and we chart out some possibilities.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Shared Molecular Mechanisms of Membrane Transporters
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    David Drew, Olga Boudker

    The determination of the crystal structures of small-molecule transporters has shed light on the conformational changes that take place during structural isomerization from outward- to inward-facing states. Rather than using a simple rocking movement of two bundles around a central substrate-binding site, it has become clear that even the most simplistic transporters utilize rearrangements of nonrigid bodies. In the most dramatic cases, one bundle is fixed while the other, structurally divergent, bundle carries the substrate some 18 Å across the membrane, which in this review is termed an elevator alternating-access mechanism. Here, we compare and contrast rocker-switch, rocking-bundle, and elevator alternating-access mechanisms to highlight shared features and novel refinements to the basic alternating-access model.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Spatial and Temporal Regulation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation and Intracellular Signal Transduction
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    John J.M. Bergeron, Gianni M. Di Guglielmo, Sophie Dahan, Michel Dominguez, Barry I. Posner

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) exemplify how receptor location is coupled to signal transduction. Extracellular binding of ligands to these RTKs triggers their concentration into vesicles that bud off from the cell surface to generate intracellular signaling endosomes. On the exposed cytosolic surface of these endosomes, RTK autophosphorylation selects the downstream signaling proteins and lipids to effect growth factor and polypeptide hormone action. This selection is followed by the recruitment of protein tyrosine phosphatases that inactivate the RTKs and deliver them by membrane fusion and fission to late endosomes. Coincidentally, proteinases inside the endosome cleave the EGF and insulin ligands. Subsequent inward budding of the endosomal membrane generates multivesicular endosomes. Fusion with lysosomes then results in RTK degradation and downregulation. Through the spatial positioning of RTKs in target cells for EGF and insulin action, the temporal extent of signaling, attenuation, and downregulation is regulated.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Understanding the Chemistry and Biology of Glycosylation with Glycan Synthesis
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Larissa Krasnova, Chi-Huey Wong

    Glycoscience research has been significantly impeded by the complex compositions of the glycans present in biological molecules and the lack of convenient tools suitable for studying the glycosylation process and its function. Polysaccharides and glycoconjugates are not encoded directly by genes; instead, their biosynthesis relies on the differential expression of carbohydrate enzymes, resulting in heterogeneous mixtures of glycoforms, each with a distinct physiological activity. Access to well-defined structures is required for functional study, and this has been provided by chemical and enzymatic synthesis and by the engineering of glycosylation pathways. This review covers general methods for preparing glycans commonly found in mammalian systems and applying them to the synthesis of therapeutically significant glycoconjugates (glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins, glycolipids, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins) and the development of carbohydrate-based vaccines.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • The Biochemistry of O-GlcNAc Transferase: Which Functions Make It Essential in Mammalian Cells?
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Zebulon G. Levine, Suzanne Walker

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) is found in all metazoans and plays an important role in development but at the single-cell level is only essential in dividing mammalian cells. Postmitotic mammalian cells and cells of invertebrates such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila can survive without copies of OGT. Why OGT is required in dividing mammalian cells but not in other cells remains unknown. OGT has multiple biochemical activities. Beyond its well-known role in adding β-O-GlcNAc to serine and threonine residues of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins, OGT also acts as a protease in the maturation of the cell cycle regulator host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) and serves as an integral member of several protein complexes, many of them linked to gene expression. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the mechanisms underlying OGT's biochemical activities and address whether known functions of OGT could be related to its essential role in dividing mammalian cells.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
  • Mechanisms of Mitotic Spindle Assembly
    Annu. Rev. Biochem. (IF 19.939) Pub Date : 2016-06-13
    Sabine Petry

    Life depends on cell proliferation and the accurate segregation of chromosomes, which are mediated by the microtubule (MT)-based mitotic spindle and ∼200 essential MT-associated proteins. Yet, a mechanistic understanding of how the mitotic spindle is assembled and achieves chromosome segregation is still missing. This is mostly due to the density of MTs in the spindle, which presumably precludes their direct observation. Recent insight has been gained into the molecular building plan of the metaphase spindle using bulk and single-molecule measurements combined with computational modeling. MT nucleation was uncovered as a key principle of spindle assembly, and mechanistic details about MT nucleation pathways and their coordination are starting to be revealed. Lastly, advances in studying spindle assembly can be applied to address the molecular mechanisms of how the spindle segregates chromosomes.

    更新日期:2017-06-21
Some contents have been Reproduced with permission of the American Chemical Society.
Some contents have been Reproduced by permission of The Royal Society of Chemistry.
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